Meera_At the Dark End of the Street.jpg

MEERA RECOMMENDS... 

AT THE DARK END OF THE STREET
by Danielle L McGuire

An essential and illuminating retelling of the history of the civil rights movement in the United States. Honoring the origins of anti-violence work is critical to building an authentic and transparent activism - one that is rooted in the truth of the past, thoughtful of the present reality, and revolutionary in its vision for equity and justice. 

 

namita book

NAMITA RECOMMENDS...

THE HAPPINESS PROJECT
by Gretchen Rubin

The Happiness Project was a super easy read and a book I could easily pick up and start again - important with a pre-schooler when you find yourself falling asleep more often than bedtime reading! Most importantly, each chapter was very actionable and I could immediately implement the strategies being employed by author Gretchen Rubin who I found myself really relating to. On multiple levels, it was highly simplified and easy... and I like simple and easy!


Sarayu book

SARAYU RECOMMENDS...

THE DOOR IN THE DREAM
by Elga Wasserman

This is a book that documents the stories of twenty-six women who were elected to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences, including a few who were Nobel Laureates. Each of their stories gives us a different insight into how being female affected their career path and how they overcame the perpetual discrimination that women faced in the field of science and the struggle to balance the demands of home and their profession. The common theme across these stories though is the passion for their research and their will and determination to overcome all odds, to succeed. So much to gain from the wisdom of these inspiring women!

 

Vishakha book

VISHAKHA RECOMMENDS...

THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY
by Irving stone

A brilliant book. A genius or simply a God!! Every page I open is an explosion of art, emotion, love, expression, enthusiasm and unrelenting passion… There can be no life without being true to your work, your art, your self! His greatest work… the David. It's incredible to read the reason why Michelangelo made David with the sling shot still in his hand, whereas everywhere else, David is portrayed after winning his battle against Goliath. But man is not a Goliath after winning a war... his war is won when he decides to fight the war… "This was the David he had been seeking, caught at the exultant height of resolution, still reflecting the emotions of fear, hesitation, repugnance, doubt…" That is the crux of our lives. As Rumi says, “Live where you fear to live. Destroy your reputation. Be notorious.”